Dog Breeds With Names

The dog evolved from the grey wolf. And, there are many dog breeds that were created in the process. We breed the dogs according to our needs. The most popular are sport, toy, terrier, hound, shepherd, pulling, rescue, and guide dog breeds. Here are some examples with dog names.

Sports are play time for dogs. It tests the wit, and agility on various breeds. Dog sports are entertaining to watch. Often, the media covers the sporting events. The most popular are Frisbee Dog, Long Jump, Hurdles, Dock Jumping, Rally Obedience, and Sheep Trials.

The terriers are small dogs that fit into tiny and cramp places. The dogs are trained to enter dens and burrows to hunt for rodents, game, and pests. The dogs need good eyesight for dark burrows, and dens. And, the dog claws are meant to dig to go in the dens and burrows. There are over twenty seven terrier dog breed like Border, Scottish, and Wire Fox Terrier.

The hounds are bred for hunting. The nose can picks up and follow the scents from far away. Many hound dogs are working dogs. They work at law enforcement to pick up the scent of narcotics. The Greyhound which is thinner, leaner, and taller can run so fast. Dalmatians may fall under the hound group. It is characterize by short white fur and black spots. Thus, a good dog names for Dalmatians are Spot, or Spotty.

The two common shepherd dogs are German shepherd and Border collie. German shepherd is a strong, loyal, and intelligent breed of dog with strong sense of smell and hearing. Often, law enforcement employs the breed. Since the fur is typically orange and black, Cinnamon is a popular dog name. After you baked the Cinnamon, it is usually color orange and black with white glaze.

German shepherd is a breed of dog with German origin. German shepherd breed started at around 1890. So, it is basically a new breed. Even though breed is new, it is one of the most popular breed of dog.

Border collie is mid-sized dog with white and black fur. Border collie is great in open space like the farm as the dogs likes to run. Farmers often use the dogs to herd sheep. Farmers trained the dog to go in any direction with a simply blow of a whistle. White and black fur covers the head that may resemble a bandit look. Hence, many dog owners select Bandit as the dog name.

The Siberian dogs were imported to Alaska during the 1908. Today, the dog evolved to Alaskan husky. It is full of stamina, endurance, strength, and speed. On sled dog competition, Alaskan husky is a popular choice. The dogs can efficiently pull the sled even in cold winter climate.

When we are hit with a strong earthquake, the quake may bring down a few buildings. In the rumble, a rescue team may use dogs to find survivor. Dog uses the amazing sense of smell, and hearing. Dogs in the hound family group have excellent sense of smell. Also, dogs are good swimmer. Some are trained to rescue the drowning victim. There are numerous records of dog that saves somebody from floods, storms, river, or any body of water.

Guide dogs help navigate the dog handler with poor vision or blind. If there are obstacles, the dogs direct the dog handler to get around the obstacles. The golden retrievers, Labradors, and German shepherd are most likely choice for the task.

A History Of Coast Guard Aviation Part Ii

During the war, Coast Guard aircraft found one thousand survivors and directed rescue units to the scene. Coast Guard aircrews rescued one hundred survivors additionally by landing in the open sea [below: Hall PH-2 medevac, circa 1942]. On occasion, the aircraft had to taxi ashore because weight of those rescued prevented the aircraft from taking off.

By 1941 the Coast Guard was very interested in developing the helicopter for search and rescue. LCDR William Kossler had represented the Coast Guard on an inter-agency board formed in 1938 for the evaluation of experimental aircraft, including the helicopter. However, World War II interrupted these plans. The Coast Guard, incorporated into the Navy on 1 November 1941, was tasked in early 1943 with developing the helicopter for antisubmarine warfare. Sikorsky HNS-1 and HOS-1 helicopters were ordered and pilot training began at Brooklyn Air Station. Coast Guard personnel trained British pilots who undertook a joint British-American helicopter trial on board the merchant ship Daghestan. In fact, during the war all Allied helicopter pilots were trained by the Coast Guard at Brooklyn Air Station. The Daghestan, fitted with a landing deck and carrying two HNS-1 helicopters, crossed the Atlantic in convoy in November 1943.

A photo of a Coast Guard aircraftAdditional helicopter evaluation tests were carried out on the cutter Cobb. This old coastal passenger ship had been converted into the world’s first helicopter carrier. On 29 June 1944 CDR Frank Erickson made the first landing on its deck in Long Island Sound. A photo of CDR Frank EricksonAs the war progressed and the U-boat threat moved deeper into the North Atlantic and then abated, the service re-oriented its helicopter research from antisubmarine warfare to search and rescue. CDR Erickson pioneered this Coast Guard activity, developing much of the rescue equipment himself and carrying out the first lifesaving flight. He delivered two cases of blood plasma lashed to an HNS-1’s floats following the explosion on board the destroyer USS Turner off Sandy Hook on 3 January 1944.

One of the early helicopter’s most successful rescues occurred in 1945. A Royal Canadian Air Force plane crashed in a remote area of Labrador. Two ski-equipped aircraft tried to rescue the nine survivors; however, one crashed on landing and the other was trapped on the ground by the snow after having successfully flown out two survivors. The only way to rescue the remaining men was by helicopter. A Coast Guard HNS-1 was disassembled at Brooklyn Air Station, loaded into a C-54 transport A photo of a Coast Guard aircraft and airlifted to Goose Bay, Labrador. There, LT August Kleisch flew it 150 miles to a staging station and then on 35 miles more to the crash site. Obstacles such as a frozen engine and skis that would freeze solid to the ground were overcome and all were rescued.A photo of Stewart Graham In 1943 an Air Sea Rescue Squadron was formed at San Diego, Calif. The primary impetus for this was the increasing number of offshore crashes, mostly by student pilots. These were the result of the rapid expansion of military aviation during the war. Initially, the amphibious PBY-5A and high speed rescue craft were chosen as the rescue vehicles and additional squadrons were formed. In December 1944 the Office of Air Sea Rescue was established at Coast Guard Headquarters. By 1945 Air Sea Rescue was responsible for 165 aircraft and nine air stations. During that year, it had responded to 686 plane crashes. The PBY-5As were replaced by Martin PBM-5Gs following the war.A photo of a Coast Guard aircraft

The post-World War II years brought an explosion in the number of recreational boats and created a new search and rescue clientele. The helicopter was ideally suited to this mission. Able to react swiftly, it could lift entire pleasure boat crews from imminent disaster, or in less trying circumstances, deliver de-watering pumps and fuel. Admittedly, during its early years the helicopter had a major handicap–the pilot needed three hands in order to fly it. Soon, helicopters rescuing distressed boaters became a commonplace event.

The versatility of the helicopter was demonstrated during a series of floods which occurred in the United States during the 1950s. To carry out this kind of rescue work, the helicopter had to hover among trees, telephone poles, television antennas and the like. In 1955 Coast Guard helicopters rescued more than 300 people as rivers overflowed in Connecticut and Massachusetts. In December of that year the Coast Guard on-scene commander directed the rescue of thousands in California. Included among the 21 rescue aircraft were Coast Guard helicopters. A photo of a Coast Guard aircraft In one incident an H04S rescued 138 people during a 12-hour period; this was accomplished by two air crews. The helicopter soon grew from a thoroughbred requiring pampering to keep it flying to a reliable workhorse.

The responsibilities of Coast Guard fixed wing aviation also increased following World War II. In 1946, Coast Guard aircraft were used for the first time on the International Ice Patrol, a practice that continues today. A photo of Coast Guard aircraft The primary objective of these Ice Patrol flights is to observe ice floating in the vicinity of the Grand Banks, so that shipping in that well-traveled area can be advised of current conditions throughout the iceberg season. Ice Patrol flight tracks are normally between 1,000 and 1,500 nautical miles long (from six to eight hours’ flight time). Since 1983 the flights have used HC130 aircraft carrying Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) equipment as the primary reconnaissance tool. At the normal altitude of 8,000 feet, the SLAR can cover a swath extending 35 miles on each side of the aircraft.

A photo of CAPT Donald MacDiarmid After the end of World War II, Coast Guard aircraft were also used increasingly to intercept and escort aircraft that were experiencing mechanical problems. The presence of the Coast Guard aircraft was reassuring to both passengers and flight crews. During the 1950s, the Coast Guard developed open-ocean ditching techniques that are still in use by commercial airliners today through the experiments conducted by CAPT Donald MacDiarmid . In 1986 Donald MacDiarmid was enshrined in the Naval Aviation Museum, in Pensacola, Florida. A photo of a Coast Guard aircraftIn 1959 the Coast Guard obtained its first Lockheed HC-130 Hercules . Large, rugged, and extremely reliable, this aircraft could cruise on two of its four engines thereby greatly extending its range. During the Korean War, the Coast Guard established air detachments through- out the Pacific. These detachments, located at Sangley Point in the Philippines, Guam, Wake, Midway, Adak, and Barbers Point in the Hawaiian Islands conducted search and rescue to safeguard the tens of thousands of United Nations troops that were being airlifted across the Pacific. In January 1953 a PBM flying from Sangley landed in 12-foot seas in an attempt to rescue a Navy P2V crew. The Coast Guard amphibian crashed on take off when an engine failed. Five Coast Guard and four Navy men lost their lives.

A photo of LT Jack RittichierAviators were among the 7,000 Coast Guard personnel who served in Vietnam. In April 1968 three Coast Guard helicopter pilots were assigned to the 37th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron at Da Nang, Vietnam. Pilots were assigned there until November 1972 while their Air Force counterparts were assigned to stateside Coast Guard air stations. One Coast Guard pilot, LT Jack Rittichier , died in a rescue attempt. He was attempting to pick up a downed Marine Corps flier when his helicopter took heavy ground fire, touched down, and burst into flames.

The helicopter continued to be a primary rescue tool into the 1980s and the foreseeable future. In 1980 over 100,000 refugees fled communist Cuba. Many risked their lives in unsafe craft to cross the Straits of Florida. The rescue of those on board the Olo Yumi is illustrative of the situation confronting the Coast Guard. On the morning of 17 May 1980 the pleasure craft Olo Yumi, carrying 52 persons, sank when the people on board panicked because of rough seas, ran to the stern, and caused water to come over the transom. A photo of a Coast Guard aircraft

A Sikorsky HH-52 Sea-Guard on patrol from the cutter Courageous (WMEC-622) sighted the people in the water and began rescue operations. Eleven survivors were hoisted to the helicopter. Other Coast Guard helicopters and Courageous rescued 38 survivors and recovered 10 bodies. The A photo of a Coast Guard aircraft boat had been grossly overloaded. The HH-52, now replaced by the Aerospatiale HH-65 Dolphin, rescued more persons from distress than any other helicopter in the world to that time.

A photo of a Coast Guard aircraftIn October 1980, the Sikorsky HH-3F Pelican, the service’s medium range helicopter, was the primary rescue vehicle when hundreds of individuals, mostly senior-citizens, were plucked from bobbing lifeboats some 200 miles out in the Gulf of Alaska. This followed a fire on board the cruise ship Prinsendam and was one of the most successful maritime rescues in history. The Pelican, the last amphibian helicopter in the Coast Guard’s inventory, was retired from service in 1994.

With the increasing responsibilities in defense readiness, law enforcement, fisheries patrol, and environmental protection, the Coast Guard acquired a new generation of aircraft to replacing its aging fleet. During the 1980s, 1990s, and into the new century, the primary aircraft in the Coast Guard inventory were the HU-25A, HU-25B, and HU-25C Guardian,A photo of a Coast Guard aircraft the HC-130H Hercules, the HH-65A and HH-65B Dolphin, and the HH-60J Jayhawk .A photo of a Coast Guard aircraft The HU-25C Guardian is the service’s first multi-mission jet. It is nearly twice as fast as any aircraft in the inventory and can get to the scene quickly to perform its role. Sixteen new HC-130H Hercules turboprop aircraft have joined the Coast Guard fleet and replaced earlier models. The primary missions of the Hercules are long-range surveillance and transport. A photo of a Coast Guard aircraft

A photo of a Coast Guard aircraft The HH-65 helicopters serve as the Coast Guard’s primary search and rescue aircraft and these twin engine Dolphins can operate up to 150 miles off shore and will fly comfortably at 150 knots for three hours. The HH-65 Jayhawk now served as the service’s medium range helicopter. The Coast Guard also continued its long-standing practice of utilizing surplus aircraft from the other services when it acquired four Grumman E2C aircraft from Navy stocks beginning in 1989. They were used as surveillance aircraft in the drug war and formed Coast Guard Airborne Warning Squadron One (or CGAW-1). Unfortunately, one crashed in 1990 while landing at Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, killing all four crewmen aboard.

A photo of a Coast Guard aircraftThe Coast Guard began leasing MH-68 Mako helicopters to outfit a new squadron, HITRON-10, formed to augment the service’s capabilities in the continuing fight against narcotics smuggling. The squadron was developed specifically to combat the drug-smugglers’ use of what are called “go-fast” boats. These MH-68s carry an armed Coast Guardsman who, if needed, could use his .50 caliber sniper rifle to disable a “go-fast” boat that refused a demand to stop and be boarded. This is not the first time Coast Guard aircraft were armed during peacetime; Loening OL-5s carried .30 caliber Lewis guns during the service’s earlier fight to enforce Prohibition.

To assist those in distress and to patrol national waters, the Coast Guard flies some 200 aircraft from 27 air stations, large and small, throughout the continental United States, Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. The Coast Guard is the seventh largest naval air force in the world. Coast Guard aviation, rotary and fixed wing, moves into the future proud of its past and confident of its future.

Adventure Travel and Hiking Trails Fees Continue To Rise

Is adventure travel getting expensive for the family? The good news for adventure travel and wilderness hiking trails is that the USA has some of the most unique and incredible places to see on earth. Our National, State Parks, Monuments and Wilderness Areas are awesome, but for years there have been reduced number of visitors. Many citizens have said that a four-year program to increase national parks entrance fees to make them more uniform may discourage some Americans from visiting their national parks such as the Grand Canyon, Yosemite, Zion and Yellowstone.

The National Parks have been faced with a budget crisis. The parks are struggling to protect the historic, cultural and natural resources that the parks were created for. The parks are short of funds for operating facilities, repairs to roads, bridges, trails and buildings. There was an 814 million dollar shortfall in 2006. There are almost 400 areas of protection covered by the National Parks Service. Almost every park has fewer full time employees now than in 2001, while there were over 273,000,000 visitors to the parks in 2005. The park service needs more funding to provide education, interpretive and for the safety requirements of their visitors. This is a time of controversy about park fees, current plans for oil, gas and mineral exploration in our parks and of course removing the O’Shaughnessy Dam to restore the Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite.

Recently the federal government has moved to replace the National Park Service’s $50 annual pass with a new $80 multi-agency pass. Some people think that the fee increases are getting out of line. The park service raised entrance fees at 34 parks over the past two years and plans to raise them at another 124 parks in 2008 and 2009. At Glacier National Park in Montana and Joshua Tree National Park in California, the fees will go up twice, and beginning in 2011, park officials plan to increase fees every three years, based on inflation. There is a proposal to double entrance fees next year at Crater Lake National Park, now $10 per car. Will it drive the local visitors away? In 1997, when the park service began raising fees, the number of national parks visitors has fallen 1% while entrance fee revenue has gone up almost 16%. Many of them are from outside the United States and love to visit the American protected lands.

Will the National Park Centennial Act to rescue our parks before 2016 – the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service? The acts purpose is to eliminate the annual operating deficit and maintenance backlog in the national parks. If it passed, it was to create a check off box on American tax returns to fund the parks. As H.R. 1124 and S 886 it did not get passed in 2006. In spring of 2006 the Government Accountability Office (GAO) issued a report about our National Parks based on research, to the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee that found that funding had not kept pace with need, requiring park managers to reduce services including, reducing visitor center hours, educational programs, basic custodial duties, and law enforcement operations, such as back-country patrolling. Additionally, the park system has been forced to close campgrounds, shorten operating hours, eliminate many interpretive programs, lay off many seasonal rangers, and eliminate many of the parks’ scientific studies programs.

So where’s the good news about our public lands? Being an outdoor writer and avid traveler to our parks and wilderness areas Bob Therrien, President of TrainingPASS Sales, Inc. has created an outdoor recreation message board, he commented “As I’ve visited the outdoors, the hardest part over the years, for me has been the research about which parks, hikes, climbs, locations and activities I want to visit with my family and friends. Exploring federal then state website after site, then mapping the distance from each area of interest is inefficient and many times lacking in information. To solve that inefficiency we have collected all the basic information about our parks, wilderness areas and national monuments and put them into one website. I don’t personally have a problem with the new park fees. It costs me more to take my family to the movies. I’d rather enjoy a full day or two at a place like Denali National Park, the Arches or Canyonlands.

The USA has incredible adventure travel wilderness and hiking trails. To promote these areas AdventureZoneTOURS created a forum for sharing trip reports on National Parks, State Parks, National Monuments and Wilderness Areas.

The Outdoor Adventure Message Board opens up to reveal a listing of U.S. States, separated into travel regions. Click on any state region and there are sub forums for all the parks, monuments and wilderness areas in that region. Many times there are several interesting choices to pick from of federal or state lands, within a state region. For the activity-specific minded, AdventureZoneTOURS.com encourages users to share trip reports for a variety of outdoor activities from hiking, climbing, canyoneering, geo exploring, photography, ghost towns, mines, and cave to water sports such as boating, fishing, jet and water skiing, tubing, rafting, and scuba. Winter travel sports such as snowmobiling, skiing and snowboarding are featured. Hunting locations, ATV and horseback trails as well as the most scenic areas for outdoor photography are also available as individual topic posts. To research or share your favorite adventure travel location, you’re invited to sign up and share today.

Think Your Door can’t get Kicked in, Think Again

Part of my role as security guy is to keep tabs on the crime climate around the globe. Recently I kept seeing article after article about burglaries with one common theme: “door kicked in”. Don’t believe me? See below. But before you do, probably all of these could have been prevented with Door Reinforcement Technology.

9/17/15 Alabama; Front door kicked in at Cahaba Road residence:
The call came in around 2:47 a.m., and officers found an unknown suspect kicked in the front door of a residence to gain entry.

9/21/15 Illinois; Bloomington Police investigating home invasion:
According to Sarah Mayer with BPD, officers were called Saturday to a home that had the door kicked in. Officers say that the resident of the home told them a young black male entered her bedroom and pointed a handgun at her, telling her to lay face down.

9/22/15 Michigan; Couple uses ‘special skills’ to help solve their own burglary:
Sergio and Maura Rodriguez returned to their Southside home on July 17 to find their front door kicked in. Burglars had stolen the couple’s television and Maura’s purse containing her Lone Star and debit cards.

9/23/15 Alabama; Law enforcement blotter:
Caller checking on location for owner, door kicked in, Ashby 2 men with 31 previous arrests nabbed in Hoover break-in 9/21/15 The break-in happened about 3:15 p.m. Thursday in the 5000 block of Tree Crossings Parkway at Ridge Crossings Apartments, said Capt. Gregg Rector. The resident arrived home to find his door kicked in. When he went inside, he interrupted two burglars.

9/24/15 Alaska; Man admits to trying to steal Toyo stove, charged with first-degree burglary:
The homeowner called troopers about 11 a.m. and said he arrived home to find his door kicked in and a man trying to steal his Toyo.

9/24/15 South Carolina; Police Blotter for Sept. 24: A 58-year-old Aiken woman reported Monday that it looked as if a nearby vacant house on Springfield Church Road was burglarized. Deputies found the back door kicked in and several appliances missing from inside.

9/25/15 Georgia; Police Blotter Residential Burglary:
800 block of Loridans Drive—A front door was kicked in and a patio door was tampered with. An Apple MacBook Pro, a black Kindle Fire, Skull Candy headphones, a Wells Fargo checkbook, a PlayStation 4 with controllers, a Burberry watch, a JOS A Bank watch, a white laundry basket, an Xbox with controllers and four games, four watches, an Amazon Fire HD7 and 500 Pesos were taken.

And

100 block of 26th Street—The top of a condo’s door lock was punctured and the door was kicked in. A MacBook Pro laptop, an Apple iPad, jewelry, iPhone 3GS, Apple iPad, Social Security card and personal papers were taken.

And

900 block of Cardova Drive—A homeowner received a text about his alarm sounding but refused police because he didn’t want to be fined. A neighbor discovered the front door kicked in and a TV from the living room was in the driveway. No other items were taken.

And

1800 block of Wellbourne Drive—A 60-inch Sony TV a WII controller, a diamond ring, an Apple MacBook Air, an Apple Thunder Bolt display, a MacBook Pro, two Apple keyboards and wireless mice, a Canon camera, a Sony video camera and a external hard drive were taken when a house’s front door was kicked in.

Now don’t think for one second, “Well I don’t live in Alabama or wherever, so I’m OK”. Wrongo bongo. Go to GoogleNews , type your Town and or state and “Door kicked In” and you will be amazed at how many results come up. Doors, without reinforcement technology are useless. Install high-grade door reinforcement technology. Door Devil, is the door jamb reinforcement I use.